Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Ward L. Churchill  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born: 1947 in Urbana, Illinois

Sites:


Illinois Connection

Ward Churchill was born in Urbana and at the age of two relocated to Elmwood, Illinois where he grew up.

Biographical and Professional Information

Ward is a writer and political activist. He was surrounded by controversy with his dismissal from the University of Colorado on charges of research misconduct. In 2009 a Denver jury determined that he had been wrongly fired.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

From a Native Son: Selected Essays on Indigenism, 1985-1995 (Mit Press Digital Communications)
ISBN: 0896085538

South End Press. 1999

Ward Churchill has emerged over the past decade as one of the strongest and most influential voices of native resistance in North America. From a Native Son collects his most important and unflinching essays, which explore the themes of

A Little Matter of Genocide: Holocaust and Denial in the Americas 1492 to the Present
ISBN: 0872863239

City Lights Publishers. 2001

Ward Churchill has achieved an unparalleled reputation as a scholar-activist and analyst of indigenous issues in North America. Here, he explores the history of holocaust and denial in this hemisphere, beginning with the arrival of Columbus and continuing on into the present.

He frames the matter by examining both "revisionist" denial of the nazi-perpatrated Holocaust and the opposing claim of its exclusive "uniqueness," using the full scope of what happened in Europe as a backdrop against which to demonstrate that genocide is precisely what has been-and still is-carried out against the American Indians.

Churchill lays bare the means by which many of these realities have remained hidden, how public understanding of this most monstrous of crimes has been subverted not only by its perpetrators and their beneficiaries but by the institutions and individuals who perceive advantages in the confusion. In particular, he outlines the reasons underlying the United States's 40-year refusal to ratify the Genocide Convention, as well as the implications of the attempt to exempt itself from compliance when it finally offered its "endorsement."

In conclusion, Churchill proposes a more adequate and coherent definition of the crime as a basis for identifying, punishing, and preventing genocidal practices, wherever and whenever they occur.

"Ward Churchill opens the X-Files of American history to examine the phenomenon of genocide in eight essays. . ." —Susan A. Miller, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

"Churchill relates the history of genocide and the struggle for a definition of the term sufficiently accurate and comprehensive, to prevent the watering down of the concept, and to cut through the misleading rhetoric which now obfuscates debate, thereby permitting this and other genocides to continue. . ." —A. Clare Brandabur, Purdue University

"Churchill paints the whole picture here – from Columbus onwards, the major and significant struggles between an ignorant but brutal Conquistadores and the all-too-vulnerable American Tribes are analysed in a context of deliberate genocide. In terms of effectiveness, it surpasses the holocaust delivered upon European Jewry by the Nazi's." —Schnews.org.uk

Ward Churchill (enrolled Keetoowah Cherokee) is Professor of American Indian Studies with the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder. A member of the American Indian Movement since 1972, he has been a leader of the Colorado chapter for the past fifteen years. Among his previous books have been Fantasies of a Master Race, Struggle for the Land, Since Predator Came, and From a Native Son.


Agents of Repression: The FBI's Secret Wars Against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement (South End Press Classics)
ISBN: 0896086461

South End Press. 2001

For those wondering how Bill Clinton could pardon white-collar fugitive Marc Rich but not Native American leader Leonard Peltier, important clues can be found in this classic study of the FBI's COINTELPRO (Counterintelligence Program). Agents of Repression includes an incisive historical account of the FBI siege of Wounded Knee, and reveals the viciousness of COINTELPRO campaigns targeting the Black Liberation movement. The authors' new introduction examines the legacies of the Panthers and AIM, and shows how the FBI still presents a threat to those committed to fundamental social change.

Ward Churchill is author of From a Native Son. Jim Vander Wall is co-author of The COINTELPRO Papers: Documents from the FBI's Secret Wars Against Dissent in the United States, with Ward Churchill.

Acts of Rebellion: The Ward Churchill Reader
ISBN: 041593155X

Routledge. 2002

What could be more American than Columbus Day? Or the Washington Redskins? For Native Americans, they are bitter reminders that they live in a world where their identity is still fodder for white society.

"The law has always been used as toilet paper by the status quo where American Indians are concerned," writes Ward Churchill in Acts of Rebellion, a collection of his most important writings from the past twenty years. Vocal and incisive, Churchill stands at the forefront of American Indian concerns, from land issues to the American Indian Movement, from government repression to the history of genocide.

Churchill, one of the most respected writers on Native American issues, lends a strong and radical voice to the American Indian cause. Acts of Rebellion shows how the most basic civil rights' laws put into place to aid all Americans failed miserably, and continue to fail, when put into practice for our indigenous brothers and sisters. Seeking to convey what has been done to Native North America, Churchill skillfully dissects Native Americans' struggles for property and freedom, their resistance and repression, cultural issues, and radical Indian ideologies.

On the Justice of Roosting Chickens: Reflections on the Consequences of U. S. Imperial Arrogance and Criminality
ISBN: 1902593790

AK Press. 2003

The United States has long been considered a deadly foe by the inhabitants of its ever-expanding "spheres of influence." In Reflections on the Justice of Roosting Chickens, Churchill examines the toll U.S. policies have taken on civilians around the world and the role activists are (or aren’t) playing to stop the carnage. The Western world was stunned to wake up on 9-11 to find that the Third World had "pushed back." By ignoring the suffering and loss of life of their victims while grieving over our own, Amercans have made themselves complicit in their government’s global slaughter. In a heartwrenching recount, Churchill reminds us of the untold millions who have perished as a result of U.S. military intervention (in either a physical, diplomatic or economic sense) in Iraq, Cambodia, Palestine, East Timor, the Americas . . . and the list goes on.

To further illustrate his point, included are annotated chronologies of U.S. military actions from 1776 to the present and a compilation of International Laws either broken or ignored by the United States. Comprehensive, yet remaining concise, this book cannot be overlooked by those still asking: "Why do they hate us?"

"Few are as eloquent or as able to maintain lucidity for the lay reader as is Churchill."—Bloomsbury Review

"Ward Churchill has carved out a special place for himself in defending the rights of oppressed people, and -exposing the dark side of past and current history, often marginalized or suppressed. These are achievements of inestimable value."—Noam Chomsky

Ward Churchill is co-director of the American Indian Movement of Colorado, a national spokesperson for the Leonard Peltier Defense Committee, and an associate professor of American Indian Studies and Communications at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Author of more than a dozen titles, he is also an indefatigable lecturer on government repression, American Indian affairs and global politics.

Kill the Indian, Save the Man: The Genocidal Impact of American Indian Residential Schools
ISBN: 0872864340

City Lights Publishers. 2004

For five consecutive generations, from roughly 1880 to 1980, Native American children in the United States and Canada were forcibly taken from their families and relocated to residential schools. The stated goal of this government program was to "kill the Indian to save the man." Half of the children did not survive the experience, and those who did were left permanently scarred. The resulting alcoholism, suicide, and the transmission of trauma to their own children has led to a social disintegration with results that can only be described as genocidal.



"The Indian residential schools in both the US and Canada... include[d] the forced exile of children and the prohibition of the use of a national language or religion.... Churchill presents a bleak yet utterly necessary history of a brutal system that was in effect until 1990." - Booklist



“Painful and powerful, Kill the Indian, Save the Man provides the first comprehensive study of the effects of the residential schools into which American Indian children were forced by the U.S. and Canadian governments. With his usual painstaking accuracy and moving prose, Churchill exposes the genocidal nature of this important dimension of the assimilationist policies that continue to decimate Native North American communities. This book is essential reading for anyone concerned with the ravages of settler state colonialism or the effects of transgenerational trauma.” - Natsu Taylor Saito, Professor of Law, Georgia State University, and author of We Have Met the Enemy…American Exceptionalism and Subversion of the Rule of Law



“The analysis and evidence deployed herein are both compelling and altogether consistent with what I’ve discovered in my own research and experience as a judge on a special tribunal assessing the effects of residential schooling on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada. I urge all people who oppose genocide—from whatever source, against whatever victims—to read this book.” - Jim Craven (Omahkohkiaayo-i’poyi), citizen of the Blackfoot Nation and Professor of Economics, Clark College



Ward Churchill is the author of A Little Matter of Genocide, among other books. He is currently a Professor of American Indian Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Since Predator Came: Notes from the Struggle for American Indian Liberation
ISBN: 1904859445

AK Press. 2005

This seminal collection of essays provides a devastating portrait of the condition of Native America. From chronicling the genocide committed by European invaders, to exposing the insidious means by which contemporary politicians and academics perpetuate the physical and cultural destruction of American Indians, Churchill’s incisive analysis and carefully documented critique comprise a demand for action. These 18 essays serve as an excellent overview of the breadth and depth of Churchill’s scholarship.

Ward Churchill (Keetoowah Cherokee) is a professor of American Indian studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. A member of the leader-ship council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado, he is a past national spokesperson for the Leonard Peltier Defense Committee. A prolific writer and lecturer, he has authored, co-authored, or edited more than 20 books.

Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America
ISBN: 1904859186

AK Press. 2007

"This extraordinarily important book cuts to the heart of one of the central reasons movements to bring about social and environmental justice always fail. The fundamental question here is: is violence ever an acceptable tool to help bring about social change? This is probably the most important question of our time, yet so often discussions around it fall into clichés and magical thinking: that somehow if we are merely good and nice enough people, the state will stop using its violence to exploit us all. Would that this were true."—Derrick Jensen, author of Endgame, from the introduction.

Pacifism, the ideology of nonviolent political resistance, has been the norm among mainstream North American progressive groups for decades. But to what end? Ward Churchill challenges the pacifist movement’s heralded victories—Gandhi in India, 1960s antiwar activists, even Martin Luther King’s civil rights movement—suggesting that their success was in spite of, rather than because of, their nonviolent tactics. Pacifism as Pathology was written as a response not only to Churchill’s frustration with his own activist experience, but also to a debate raging in the activist and academic communities. He argues that pacifism is in many ways counterrevolutionary

that it defends the status quo, and doesn’t lead to social change. In these times of upheaval and global protest, this is a vital and extremely relevant book.

Ward Churchill is a prolific writer and lecturer, having authored, co-authored, or edited over twenty books. He is a member of the leadership council of Colorado AIM (American Indian Movement).

In Oakland, California on March 24, 2015 a fire destroyed the AK Press warehouse along with several other businesses. Please consider visiting the AK Press website to learn more about the fundraiser to help them and their neighbors.