Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Carolyn Eastwood  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born: in Canton, Ohio

Sites:


Illinois Connection

Carolyn moved to the Chicago area in 1943. She has a M. A. in Anthropolgy from Northern Illinois University.

Biographical and Professional Information

Carolyn Eastwood was born in Canton, Ohio, and grew up in Detroit, Michigan. She relocated to the Chicago area in 1943, but has lived and worked in many locations across the U.S. and throughout the world, including Washington D.C., England, Israel, and Italy. Her extensive travels and studies have concentrated on markets, vendors, and ethnic occupations in low-income communities.Carolyn received her B.A. in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin, and her M.A. in Anthropology from Northern Illinois University. She received her Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis from the University of Illinois at Chicago with the dissertation entitled, "A Study of the Regulation of Chicago’s Street Vendors."Carolyn is an adjunct professor of Anthropology at the College of DuPage, and at Roosevelt University in Chicago. She resides in Glen Ellyn, Illinois.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Near West Side Stories: Struggles for Community in Chicago's Maxwell Street Neighborhood (Illinois)
ISBN: 1893121097

Lake Claremont Press. 2002

A current and ongoing story of unequal power in Chicago, this book tells the story of four representatives of immigrant and migrant groups—Jewish, Italian, African-American, and Mexican—that have had a distinct territorial presence in the Maxwell Street area. The interviewees reminisce fondly on life in the neighborhood and tell of their struggles to save it and the 120-year-old Maxwell Street Market that was at its core.

Midwest Independent Publishers Association Book Award - 2nd Place - Midwest Regional Interest

Harold, Florence, Nate, and Hilda Dragon Slayers at Halsted and Roosevelt

"You could be St. George and you couldn't slay that dragon," said Florence Scala. She was referring to her epic fight to preserve the Italian Taylor Street community from Mayor Richard J. Daley's plan to redevelop it for the University of Illinois. Yet, Scala and other ordinary citizens in Chicago's port-of-entry Near West Side neighborhood persisted in their extraordinary battles against some of the biggest power players in a city of clout.

"Near West Side Stories: Struggles For Community in Chicago's Maxwell Street Neighborhood" is an ongoing story of unequal power in Chicago. Four representatives of immigrant and migrant groups that have had a distinct territorial presence in the area--one Jewish, one Italian, one African-American, and one Mexican--reminisce fondly on life in the old neighborhood and tell of their struggles to save it and the 120-year-old Maxwell Street Market that was at its core.

"Near West Side Stories" brings this saga of community strife up to date, while giving a voice to the everyday people who were routinely discounted or ignored in the big decisions that affected their world. Though "slaying that dragon"--fending off the encroachments of those wielding great power--was nearly impossible, we see in the details of their lives the love for a place that compelled Harold, Florence, Nate, and Hilda to make the quest.