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Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Tim Pauketat  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

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The author is a professor at the University of Illinois

Biographical and Professional Information


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Cahokia: Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi (Penguin Library of American Indian History)
ISBN: 0670020907

Viking. 2009

The fascinating story of a lost city and an unprecedented civilization

Almost a thousand years ago, a Native American city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. Cahokia was a thriving metropolis at its height with a population of twenty thousand, a sprawling central plaza, and scores of spectacular earthen mounds. The city gave rise to a new culture that spread across the plains

yet by 1400 it had been abandoned, leaving only the giant mounds as monuments and traces of its influence in tribes we know today.

In Cahokia, anthropologist Timothy R. Pauketat reveals the story of the city and its people as uncovered by the dramatic digs of American corn-belt archaeologists. These excavations have revealed evidence of a powerful society, including complex celestial timepieces, the remains of feasts big enough to feed thousands, and disturbing signs of large-scale human sacrifice.

Drawing on these pioneering digs and a wealth of analysis by historians and archaeologists, Pauketat provides a comprehensive picture of what's been discovered about Cahokia and how these findings have challenged our perceptions of Native Americans. Cahokia is a lively read and a compelling narrative of prehistoric America.

North American Archaeology
ISBN: 0631231846

Wiley-Blackwell. 2004

This volume offers a rich and informative introduction to North American archaeology for all those interested in the history and culture of North American natives.


  • Organized around central topics and debates within the discipline.
  • Illustrated with case studies based on the lives of real people, to emphasize human agency, cultural practice, the body, issues of inequality, and the politics of archaeological practice.
  • Highlights current understandings of cultural and historical processes in North America and situates these understandings within a global perspective.

Cahokia Mounds (Digging for the Past)
ISBN: 0195158105

Oxford University Press. 2004

Describes what is known of the ancient city of Cahokia, a site in present-day Illinois which was inhabited by Native Americans from about 700 A.D. to 1400 A.D., the Missippippian culture of which it was a part, and the archaeological investigations undertaken there.

The Holdener Site: Late Woodland, Emergent Mississippian, and Mississippian Occupations in the American Bottom Uplands (11-S-685). Vol. 26 (American Bottom Archaeology)
ISBN: 025206416X

Illinois Transportation. 1994

This report details the restricted usage, localized resource utilization, and brief occupation of this site during the seventh through eleventh centuries A.D.

Chiefdoms and Other Archaeological Delusions (Issues in Eastern Woodlands Archaeology)
ISBN: 0759108285

AltaMira Press. 2007

In recent decades anthropology, especially ethnography, has supplied the prevailing models of how human beings have constructed, and been constructed by, their social arrangements. In turn, archaeologists have all too often relied on these models to reconstruct the lives of ancient peoples. In lively, engaging, and informed prose, Timothy Pauketat debunks much of this social-evolutionary theorizing about human development, as he ponders the evidence of 'chiefdoms' left behind by the Mississippian culture of the American southern heartland. This book challenges all students of history and prehistory to reexamine the actual evidence that archaeology has made available, and to do so with an open mind.

Ancient Cahokia and the Mississippians (Case Studies in Early Societies)
ISBN: 0521817404

Cambridge University Press. 2004

The ancient capital of Cahokia and a series of lesser population centers developed in the Mississippi valley in North America between the eighth and fifteenth centuries AD, leaving behind an extraordinarily rich archaeological record. Cahokia's gigantic pyramids, finely crafted artifacts, and dense population mark it as the founding city of the Mississippian civilization, formerly known as the 'mound' builders. As Cahokian ideas and objects were widely sought, a cultural and religious ripple effect spread across the mid-continent and into the South. In its wake, population migrations and social upheavals transformed social life along the ancient Mississippi River. In this important new survey, Timothy Pauketat outlines the development of Mississippian civilization, presenting a wealth of archaeological evidence and advancing our understanding of the American Indians whose influence extended into the founding moments of the United States and lives on today in American archaeology.

The Archaeology of Traditions: Agency and History Before and After Columbus (Florida Museum of Natural History: Ripley P. Bullen Series)
ISBN: 0813027454

University Press of Florida. 2001

"At last, southeastern archaeology as history of people, not just 'cultures'."--Patricia Galloway, Mississippi Department of Archives and History


Rich with the objects of the day-to-day lives of illiterate or common people in the southeastern United States, this book offers an archaeological reevaluation of history itself: where it is, what it is, and how it came to be. Through clothing, cooking, eating, tool making, and other mundane forms of social expression and production, traditions were altered daily in encounters between missionaries and natives, between planters and slaves, and between native leaders and native followers. As this work demonstrates, these "unwritten texts" proved to be potent ingredients in the larger-scale social and political events that shaped how peoples, cultures, and institutions came into being.

These developments point to a common social process whereby men and women negotiated about their views of the world and—whether slaves, natives, or Europeans—created history. Bridging the pre-Columbian and colonial past, this book incorporates

current theories that cut across disciplines to appeal to anthropologists, historians, and archaeologists.


CONTENTS

1. A New Tradition in Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat
2. African-American Tradition and Community in the Antebellum South, by Brian W. Thomas
3. Resistance and Accommodation in Apalachee Province, by John F. Scarry
4. Manipulating Bodies and Emerging Traditions at the Los Adaes Presidio, by Diana DiPaolo Loren
5. Negotiated Tradition? Native American Pottery in the Mission Period in La Florida, by Rebecca Saunders
6. Creek and Pre-Creek Revisited, by Cameron B. Wesson
7. Gender, Tradition, and the Negotiation of Power Relationships in Southern Appalachian Chiefdoms, by Lynne P. Sullivan and Christopher B. Rodning
8. Historical Science or Silence? Toward a Historical Anthropology of Mississippian Political Culture, by Mark A. Rees
9. Cahokian Change and the Authority of Tradition, by Susan M. Alt
10. The Historical-Processual Development of Late Woodland Societies, by Michael S. Nassaney
11. A Tradition of Discontinuity: American Bottom Early and Middle Woodland Culture History Reexamined, by Andrew C. Fortier
12. Interpreting Discontinuity and Historical Process in Midcontinental Late Archaic and Early Woodland Societies, by Thomas E. Emerson and Dale L. McElrath
13. Hunter-Gatherers and Traditions of Resistance, by Kenneth E. Sassaman
14. Traditions as Cultural Production: Implications for Contemporary Archaeological Research, by Kent G. Lightfoot
15. Concluding Thoughts on Tradition, History, and Archaeology, by Timothy R. Pauketat


Timothy R. Pauketat, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana, is the author of The Ascent of Chiefs and coeditor of Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World.

Cahokia: Domination and Ideology in the Mississippian World (American Indian Lives)
ISBN: 0803287658

University of Nebraska Press. 2000

About one thousand years ago, Native Americans built hundreds of earthen platform mounds, plazas, residential areas, and other types of monuments in the vicinity of present-day St. Louis. This sprawling complex, known to archaeologists as Cahokia, was the dominant cultural, ceremonial, and trade center north of Mexico for centuries. This stimulating collection of essays casts new light on the remarkable accomplishments of Cahokia.

The Ascent of Chiefs: Cahokia and Mississippian Politics in Native North America
ISBN: 0817307281

University Alabama Press. 1994

This ambitious book provides a theoretical explanation of how prehistoric Cahokia became a stratified society, and ultimately the pinnacle of Native American cultural achievement north of Mexico. Considering Cahokia in terms of class struggle, Pauketat claims that the political consolidation in this region of the Mississippi Valley happened quite suddenly, around A.D. 1000, after which the lords of Cahokia innovated strategies to preserve their power and ultimately emerged as divine chiefs. The new ideas and new data in this volume will invigorate the debate surrounding one of the most important developments in North American prehistory.



Lords of the Southeast: Social Inequality and the Native Elites of Southeastern North America (Archeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association, No. 3)
ISBN: 0913167487

American Anthropological Association. 1992