Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Steve Hochstadt  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born:


-- Facebook -- http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Steve-Hochstadt/138605746163904=steve+hochstadt
-- Steve Hochstadt on WorldCat -- http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=steve+hochstadt


Illinois Connection

Steve is a professor of history at Illinois College in Jacksonville, Illinois.

Biographical and Professional Information

Steve Hochstadt is a professor of history at Illinois College in Jacksonville, Illinois. He joined the faculty in 2006 after teaching for 27 years at Bates College in Maine. He has done extensive research on Jewish refugees who fled to Shanghai. Influenced by his grandparents, Viennese Jews who fled the Holocaust and immigrated to Shanghai, Hochstadt conducted 100 interviews with former refugees now living in the United States and Europe. Based on his studies he wrote several books about the Holocaust and especially about Jewish refugees in Asia. Hochstadt holds the position of treasurer at the Sino-Judaic Institute, a non profit organization that promotes cooperation in matters of mutual historic and cultural interest between Chinese and Jewish people.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Mobility and Modernity: Migration in Germany, 1820-1989 (Social History, Popular Culture, And Politics In Germany)
ISBN: 0472109448

University of Michigan Press. 1999

Mobility and Modernity uses voluminous German data on migrations over the past two centuries to demonstrate why conventional assumptions about the relationship between mobility and modernity must be revised.
Thus far the changing total volume of migration has not been traced over a long period for any country. Unique migration registration statistics, both detailed and broadly geographical in coverage, allow the precise plotting of migration rates in Germany since 1820. Steve Hochstadt combines careful quantitative methods, easily understood numerical data, and social analysis based upon broad reading in German social history to show that current beliefs about the direction and timing of changes in German mobility, which have been based on late nineteenth-century anxieties about urbanization and industrialization, do not match the data.
Migration rates in Germany rose continuously throughout the nineteenth century, and have fallen during the twentieth century. Mobility, Hochstadt argues, was not an unprecedented accompaniment to industrialization, but a traditional rural response to specific economic changes. Hochstadt's more precise analysis of urban in- and outmigration shows the mechanism of urbanization to have been the migration of families rather than the much greater, but also more circular, migration of single men and women.
Hochstadt demonstrates the importance of examining historical behavior, powerfully justifying the methods of historical demography as a path to social understanding. The data and specific conclusions are German, but the methods and reinterpretaion of migration history have much wider application, both to other modern European nations and to currently developing countries. Those who study the modern social history of Europe, the mechanisms that formed urban working classes, and the methods of historical demography will be interested in Hochstadt's work.
Steven Hochstadt was awarded the Social Science History Association's Allan Sharlin Memorial Award in 2000 for Mobility and Modernity. He is Associate Professor of History, Bates College.

Sources of the Holocaust (Documents in History)
ISBN: 0333963458

Palgrave. 2004

This new collection of original Holocaust documents and sources brings readers into direct contact with perpetrators and victims. The words of Nazi leaders and common soldiers, SS doctors and European collaborators show how and why they planned and participated in mass murder. Jewish and non-Jewish victims speak of their persecution and resistance. Steve Hochstadt's commentary on each source outlines the historical causes and step-by-step development of the Holocaust, as well as the continuing debates about its significance.


Speaking Engagements

Speaking Engagement Availability (No)