Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Dan Monroe  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born:

Sites:


Illinois Connection

Monroe earned a Ph. D. in history at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He taught at Bradley University and now teaches at Milliken University.

Biographical and Professional Information

Monroe earned a doctorate in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has received the Heiligenstein Award for Teaching Excellence and the Griswold Distinguished Professorship in History. He was a fellow at the Virginia Historical Society and Lincoln Legal Papers. He currently teaches a variety of courses at Milliken University, including his new course, ''Abraham Lincoln in History and Film''.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

At home with Illinois Governors: A social history of the Illinois Executive Mansion, 1855-2003
ISBN: 0972561005

Illinois Executive Mansion Association. 2002

In depth information

The Republican Vision of John Tyler
ISBN: 158544216X

Texas A&M University Press. 2003

Historians have generally ranked John Tyler as one of the least successful chief executives, despite achievements such as the WebsterAshburton treaty, which heralded improved relations with Great Britain, and the annexation of Texas. Why did Tyler pursue what appears to have been a politically selfdestructive course with regard to both his first party, the Democrats, and his later political alliance, the Whigs? Monroe has set out to explain the beliefs that led to Tyler=s resigning his Senate seat and exercising politically suicidal presidential vetoes as well as examines the crises Tyler faced during his term in the House: the Panic of 1819, the financially tottering national bank, and the Missouri debate.

Shapers of the Great Debate on the Civil War: A Biographical Dictionary (Shapers of the Great American Debates)
ISBN: 0313317453

Greenwood. 2005

With the conclusion of the Mexican War in 1848, the United States seemed poised to fulfill the manifest destiny that was on the lips of journalists and politicians. Yet, even before the war was over, tensions over the issue of slavery erupted. Slavery symbolized the social, cultural, constitutional, and economic differences that were dividing the North and South. Through four years of bloody civil war and the loss of over 600,000 lives, the American republic decided the fate of slavery, asserted the supremacy of the federal government over state authority, and began to grapple with the difficult issues of reconstruction. This work provides substantial biographical entries of 20 individuals who shaped and defined the debates during the Civil War period. Political and military figures, such as Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee, writers such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, and abolitionist reformers, such as Frederick Douglass and George Fitzhugh, are included.

With the conclusion of the Mexican War in 1848, the United States seemed poised to fulfill the manifest destiny that was on the lips of journalists and politicians. Yet, even before the war was over, tensions over the issue of slavery erupted. Slavery symbolized the social, cultural, constitutional, and economic differences that were dividing the North and South. Through four years of bloody civil war and the loss of over 600,000 lives, the American republic decided the fate of slavery, asserted the supremacy of the federal government over state authority, and began to grapple with the difficult issues of reconstruction. This work provides substantial biographical entries of 20 individuals who shaped and defined the debates during the Civil War period. Political and military figures, such as Abraham Lincoln and Robert E. Lee, writers such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, and abolitionist reformers, such as Frederick Douglass and George Fitzhugh, are included.

Each biography provides a concise account of the subject's life, followed by an analysis of the figure's role and contribution to the central issues of the day, and concludes with a bibliography of secondary and primary sources available to students. An appendix of over 180 additional biographies highlights the lives of others who played a role in the debates of the Civil War.