Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Maude Lavin  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born:

Sites:


Illinois Connection

Maude is a Professor of Visual and Critical Studies; Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago.

Biographical and Professional Information

Maud Lavin is a nonfiction writer and cultural historian. She is a professor of Visual and Critical Studies and Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is a recent recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts grant.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Cut with the Kitchen Knife : The Weimar Photomontages of Hannah Hoch
ISBN: 0300061641

Yale University Press. 1993

Lightly Used Out of Print Softcover Edition published by Yale University Press, New Haven, CT., 1993, 260 pages (illustrated) in Very Good Condition. Cover has slight shelf-wear, minor scuffing. Text is clean and unmarked with no rips, tears, creases or loose pages. There is a turned-down corner on the back End Sheet, rest of the text is clean and sharp. Spine is firm and uncreased but with a slight tilt. An important pioneer of the artform that became known as photomontage. Hoch (November 1, 1889 to May 31, 1978) was a German Dada artist. She is best known for her work of the Weimar period, when she was one of the originators of photomontage. Hch was the lone woman among the Berlin Dada group, however she was dismayed to the Dadaists lip service to women's emancipation and her work echos her feelings that there were difference between women in media and reality. Marriage did not escape her criticism. She depicted brides as mannequins and children, reflecting the idea that women are not seen as complete people and have little control over their lives. A long-time German resident, her work fell out of favor after WWII although she continued to produce her photomontages and exhibit them internationally until her death in 1978. The Berlin Dadaists - the "monteurs" (mechanics) - would use scissors and glue rather than paintbrushes and paints to express their views of modern life through images presented by the media. A variation on the collage technique, photomontage utilized actual or reproductions of real photographs printed in the press. We ship within 24 hours of your purchase with a Delivery Confirmation.

Clean New World: Culture, Politics, and Graphic Design
ISBN: 0262621703

The MIT Press. 2002

Maud Lavin approaches design from the broader field of visual culture criticism, asking challenging questions about about who really has a voice in the culture and what unseen influences affect the look of things designers produce.

Our culture is dominated by the visual. Yet most writing on design reflects a narrow preoccupation with products, biographies, and design influences. Maud Lavin approaches design from the broader field of visual culture criticism, asking challenging questions about about who really has a voice in the culture and what unseen influences affect the look of things designers produce. Lavin shows how design fits into larger questions of power, democracy, and communication. Many corporate clients instruct designers to convey order and clarity in order to give their companies the look of a clean new world. But since designers cannot clean up messy reality, Lavin shows, they often end up simply veiling it.

Lacking the power to influence the content of their commercial work, many designers work simultaneously on other, more fulfilling projects. Lavin is especially interested in the graphic designer's role in shaping cultural norms. She examines the anti-Nazi propaganda of John Heartfield, the modernist utopian design of Kurt Schwitters and the neue ring werbegestalter, the alternative images of women by studio ringl + pit, the activist work of such contemporary designers as Marlene McCarty and Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, and the Internet innovations of David Steuer and others. Throughout the book, Lavin asks how designers can expand the pleasure, democracy, and vitality of communication.

The Business of Holidays
ISBN: 1580931502

The Monacelli Press. 2004

Holiday celebrations in the United States are a major force driving the nation's approximately $3 trillion retail economy. The commercial culture of holidays extends from the traditional -- decorations, costumes, and cards -- to the immaterial and ephemeral -- phone calls, airline tickets, and department store bills. Simultaneously colorful presentation and careful analysis, The Business of Holidays interprets holiday commerce and design, corporate culture, and tradition (invented and inherited). This volume consists of more than thirty-five essays arranged according to the calendar year, from New Year's Day and Martin Luther King, Jr. Day to Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa, and explores longstanding holiday images, such as Santa Claus and shamrocks, as well as quirkier aspects of visual culture. The rites that surround these special days have been adopted, or even invented by, the pervasive marketing that surrounds them to such an extent that the celebration of holidays and the business of holidays have become inseparable.

The Oldest We've Ever Been: Seven True Stories of Midlife Transitions
ISBN: 0816526168

University of Arizona Press. 2008

I had this idea of where I should be in middle age, an image that had been born in the 1950s when I’d been a child watching Lassie on TV. As outdated as it was, that blurred snapshot somewhere at the back of my mind actually did have a green lawn, a house, a picket fence, and two kids: a boy and a girl. In the corner, there was my husband in a suit coming home from work. And was that me at the front door in an apron? Did every woman my age have a similar snapshot in their mental scrapbook? In the decades since Lassie, maybe I’d managed to update the picture some. I’d erased the apron and added a home office instead. Still, there it was. And here I was, nowhere near it.

In this engaging collection, editor Maud Lavin has enlisted seven talented writers to share their stories of midlife transitions, reflecting the unpredictable challenges and unexpected graces that characterize this multilayered stage of life. The writers—Kim Larsen, Calvin Forbes, Ellen McMahon, Allan deSouza, Peggy Shinner, William Davies King, and Maud Lavin together with Locke Bowman—offer a wide range of stories and experiences that are both universal and deeply personal in their details.

From tales of divorce and dating through the lens of an eccentric collecting habit to the challenges of dealing with a close friend’s grave illness, these memorable essays evoke a complex, honest, and often surprising picture of what it means to be middle-aged. The authors aim to share stories appreciating midlife, not as the problem child of self-help books (those many manuals that claim to have the answer to menopausal mood swings or abdominal fat or bone thinning), but as a wealth of events and perceptions and feelings never experienced before. This richly layered montage offers readers a chance to reflect on the gifts of this age and, finally, to savor the idea of being “the oldest we’ve ever been.”

Push Comes to Shove: New Images of Aggressive Women (MIT Press)
ISBN: 0262123096

The MIT Press. 2010

The new celebration of women's aggression in contemporary culture, from Kill Bill and Prime Suspect to the artists group Toxic Titties.

In the past, more often than not, aggressive women have been rebuked, told to keep a lid on, turn the other cheek, get over it. Repression more than aggression was seen as woman's domain. But recently there's been a noticeable cultural shift. With growing frequency, women's aggression is now celebrated in contemporary culture―in movies and TV, online ventures, and art. In Push Comes to Shove, Maud Lavin examines these new images of aggressive women and how they affect women's lives.

Aggression, says Lavin, need not entail causing harm to another

we can think of it as the use of force to create change―fruitful, destructive, or both. And over the past twenty years, contemporary culture has shown women seizing this power. Lavin chooses provocative examples to explore the complexity of aggression, including the surfer girls in Blue Crush, Helen Mirren as Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect, the homicidal women in Kill Bill, and artist Marlene McCarty's mural-sized Murder Girls.

Women need aggression and need to use it consciously, Lavin writes. With Push Comes to Shove, she explores the crucial questions of how to manifest aggression, how to represent it, and how to keep open a cultural space for it.