Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Ted McClelland  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Audience: Adult;

Born: 1967 in Lansing, Michigan


-- Website -- http://edwardmcclelland.
-- Ted McClelland on WorldCat -- http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=ted+mcclelland


Illinois Connection

McClelland lives in Chicago.

Biographical and Professional Information

McClelland, who grew up in Lansing, Michigan, now lives in Chicago. After getting his start in journalism at the ''Lansing State Journal'', he later worked as a staff writer for the ''Chicago Reader''. His writing has appeared in ''The New York Times'', ''Los Angeles Times'', ''Columbia Journalism Review'', ''Salon'', ''Slate'' and ''The Nation''.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Horseplayers: Life at the Track
ISBN: 155652675X

Chicago Review Press. 2007

The author spent a year at tracks and off-track betting facilities in Chicago and across the country, profiling the people who make a career of gambling on horses. This account follows his personal journey of what it means to be a horseplayer as he gambles with his book advance using various betting and handicapping strategies along the way.

The Third Coast: Sailors, Strippers, Fishermen, Folksingers, Long-Haired Ojibway Painters, and God-Save-the-Queen Monarchists of the Great Lakes
ISBN: 1556527217

Chicago Review Press. 2008

Chronicling the author’s 10,000-mile “Great Lakes Circle Tour,” this travel memoir seeks to answer a burning question: Is there a Great Lakes culture, and if so, what is it? Largely associated with the Midwest, the Great Lakes region actually has a culture that transcends the border between the United States and Canada. United by a love of encased meats, hockey, beer, snowmobiling, deer hunting, and classic-rock power ballads, the folks in Detroit have more in common with citizens in Windsor, Ontario, than those in Wichita, Kansas—while Toronto residents have more in common with Chicagoans than Montreal's population. Much more than a typical armchair travel book, this humorous cultural exploration is filled with quirky people and unusual places that prove the obscure is far more interesting than the well known.

Young Mr. Obama: Chicago and the Making of a Black President
ISBN: 1608190609

Bloomsbury Press. 2010

Barack Obama's inspirational politics and personal mythology have overshadowed his fascinating history. Young Mr. Obama gives us the missing chapter: the portrait of the politician as a young leader, often too ambitious for his own good, but still equipped with a rare ability to inspire change. The route to the White House began on the streets of Chicago's South Side.

Edward McClelland, a veteran Chicago journalist, tells the real story of the first black president's political education in the capital of the African American political community. Obama's touch wasn't always golden, and the unflappable and charismatic campaigner we know today nearly derailed his political career with a disastrous run for Congress in 2000.

Obama learned from his mistakes, and rebuilt his public persona. Young Mr. Obama is a masterpiece of political reporting, peeling away the audacity, the T-shirts, and the inspiring speeches to craft acompelling and surpassingly readable account of how local politics shaped a national leader.

Nothin' But Blue Skies: The Heyday, Hard Times, and Hopes of America's Industrial Heartland
ISBN: 1608195295

Bloomsbury Press. 2013

The Upper Midwest and Great Lakes region became the "arsenal of democracy"-the greatest manufacturing center in the world-in the years during and after World War II, thanks to natural advantages and a welcoming culture. Decades of unprecedented prosperity followed, memorably punctuated by riots, strikes, burning rivers, and oil embargoes. A vibrant, quintessentially American character bloomed in the region's cities, suburbs, and backwaters.

But the innovation and industry that defined the Rust Belt also helped to hasten its demise. An air conditioner invented in Upstate New York transformed the South from a sweaty backwoods to a non-unionized industrial competitor. Japan and Germany recovered from their defeat to build fuel-efficient cars in the stagnant 1970s. The tentpole factories that paid workers so well also filled the air with soot, and poisoned waters and soil. The jobs drifted elsewhere, and many of the people soon followed suit.

Nothin' but Blue Skies tells the story of how the country's industrial heartland grew, boomed, bottomed, and hopes to be reborn. Through a propulsive blend of storytelling and reportage, celebrated writer Edward McClelland delivers the rise, fall, and revival of the Rust Belt and its people.


Awards

Great Lakes Book Award in General Nonfiction for ''The Third Coast'' in 2008

Availability for Public Speaking

Speaking Engagement Availability: (Yes)