Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Charles Fanning  

Pen Name: None

Genre:

Audience: Adult;

Born: 1942 in Norwood, Massachusetts


-- Charles Fanning on WorldCat -- http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=charles+fanning


Illinois Connection

Fanning was a professor of English and History at SIU in Carbondale

Biographical and Professional Information

Attended Bridgewater State College, in Bridgewater,MA. Also, a director of Irish and Irish Immigration Studies program. He has written a number of critical works examining the contributions of Irish Americans to literary history. He earned degrees from Harvard the Univerity of Pennsylvania.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Finley Peter Dunne & Mr. Dooley: The Chicago Years
ISBN: 159740201X

ACLS History E-Book Project. 2001

Finley Peter Dunne, American journalist and humorist, is justly famous for his creation of Mr. Dooley, the Chicago Irish barkeep whose weekly commentary on national politics, war, and human nature kept Americans chuckling over their newspapers for nearly two decades at the beginning of this century.

Largely forgotten in the files of Chicago newspapers, however, are over 300 Mr. Dooley columns written in the 1890s before national syndication made his name a household word. Charles Fanning offers here the first critical examination of these early Dooley pieces, which, far better than the later ones, reveal the depth and development of the character and his creator.

Dunne created in Mr. Dooley a vehicle for expressing his criticism of Chicago's corruption despite the conservatism of most of his publishers. Dishonest officials who could not be safely attacked in plain English could be roasted with impunity in the "pure Roscommon brogue" of a fictional comic Irishman. In addition, Dunne painted, through the observations of his comic persona, a vivid and often poignant portrait of the daily life of Chicago's working-class Irish community and the impact of assimilation into American life. He also offered cogent views of American urban political life, already dominated by the Irish as firmly in Chicago as in other large American cities, and of the tragicomic phenomenon of Irish nationalism.

Mr. Fanning's penetrating examination of these early Dooley pieces clearly establishes Dunne as far more than a mere humorist. Behind Mr. Dooley's marvelously comic pose and ironic tone lies a wealth of material germane to the social and literary history of turn-of-the century America.

The Exiles of Erin: Nineteenth Century Irish-American Fiction
ISBN: 0802313159

Dufour Editions. 1997

Of immense value to anyone interested in the Irish story in America."" - The Boston Globe. This collection of three generations of Irish immigrant fiction excerpted from novels, magazines, and newspapers provides new insight into the nineteenth-century immigrant experience. It captures the spirit of those who were experiencing the traumas of adjustment and assimilation. The men and women authors of these pieces vividly render the details of immigrant life in a variety of settings, from Virginia and Nebraska to San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, Philadelphia, and Boston, from 1820 to 1906. Fanning places each selection in its historical and cultural context by means of introductory notes. Together, they provide the most extended, continuous body of literature available to us by members of a single American ethnic group. This new edition provides some additional selections as well as new background material. Charles Fanning is Professor of English at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale

The Irish Voice In America 250 years of Irish-American Fiction second edition
ISBN: 0813109701

University Press of Kentucky. 1999

In this study, Charles Fanning has written the first general account of the origins and development of a literary tradition among American writers of Irish birth or background who have explored the Irish immigrant or ethnic experience in works of fiction. The result is a portrait of the evolving fictional self-consciousness of an immigrant group over a span of 250 years.

Fanning traces the roots of Irish-American writing back to the eighteenth century and carries it forward through the traumatic years of the Famine to the present time with an intensely productive period in the twentieth century beginning with James T. Farrell. Later writers treated in depth include Edwin O'Connor, Elizabeth Cullinan, Maureen Howard, and William Kennedy. Along the way he places in the historical record many all but forgotten writers, including the prolific Mary Ann Sadlier. The Irish Voice in America is not only a highly readable contribution to American literary history but also a valuable reference to many writers and their works.

For this second edition, Fanning has added a chapter that covers the fiction of the past decade. He argues that contemporary writers continue to draw on Ireland as a source and are important chroniclers of the modern American experience.


Awards

Frederick Jackson Turner Award, Organization of American Historians,American Book Award, Before Columbus Foundation,Book Pirse in Literary Criticism, American Conference for Irish Studies

Availability for Public Speaking

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