Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Jane Addams  

Pen Name: None

Genre: Non-Fiction

Born: September 6, 1860 in Cedarville, Illinois

Died: May 21, 1935 in Chicago, Illinois


-- Jane Addams on WorldCat -- http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=jane+addams


Illinois Connection

Addams was born in Cedarville, Illinois and was founder and long-time director of the Hull-House in Chicago.

Biographical and Professional Information

Jane Addams, founder and long-time director of Hull-House, Chicago's pioneering social settlement house, wrote extensively on social issues. Her masterpiece, ''Twenty Years at Hull-House'' (1910), is both an autobiography and a history of Hull-House. She also wrote a sequel, ''The Second Twenty Years at Hull-House'' (1930), and a number of other books on social themes, including ''Democracy and Social Ethics'' (1902) and ''Newer Ideals of Peace'' (1907). She was the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

Democracy and Social Ethics: And Other Essays
ISBN: 0403008247

Scholarly Pr. 1902

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.

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Newer Ideals of Peace
ISBN: 0252073452

University of Illinois Press. 2007

In this her second book, Jane Addams moves beyond humanitarian appeals to sensibility and prudence, advancing a more aggressive, positive idea of peace as a dynamic social process emerging out of the poorer quarters of cosmopolitan cities. Her deep analysis of relations among diverse groups in U.S. society, exemplified by inter-ethnic and labor relations in Chicago, draws widely useful lessons for both domestic and global peace, in an early formulation of today’s "globalization from below."

In an unprecedented, revolutionary critique of the pervasive militarization of society, Addams applies her scathing pen to traditional advocates and philosophers of “negative” peace, founders of the U.S. constitution, militarists, bigots, imperialists, and theories of “democratic peace” and liberal capitalism. Instead she sees a slow, powerful emergence of forces from below--the poor, the despised, workers, women, ethnic and racial communities, oppressed groups at home and abroad--that would invent moral substitutes for war and gradually shape a just, peaceful, and varied social order. An extensive, in-depth introduction by Berenice Carroll and Clinton Fink provides historical context, analysis, and a reassessment of the theoretical and practical significance of Newer Ideals of Peace today.

The Spirit Of Youth And The City Streets (1912)
ISBN: 054858835X

Kessinger Publishing, LLC. 2007

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Twenty Years at Hull-House: With Autobiographical Notes
ISBN: 0486457494

Dover Publications. 2008

In 1889, while many Americans were disdainful of newly arrived immigrants, Jane Addams established Hull-House as a refuge for Chicago's poor. The settlement house provided an unprecedented variety of social services.

In this inspiring autobiography, Addams

chronicles the institution's early years and discusses

the ever-relevant philosophy of social justice that served as its foundation.
Addams, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931 for her philanthropic work, explains her motives for creating the institution and outlines its main activities. She also discusses many of her

beliefs,

including the need for commitment of federal agencies to services for immigrants, as well as

socialized education. Filled with observations on everyday life, accounts of practical action, and prescriptions for public policy, Twenty Years at Hull-House remains a rich source of provocative social theory. This edition of Addams's classic of American intellectual and social history features more than 50 illustrations.

Women at The Hague: The International Congress of Women and Its Results
ISBN: 0252071565

University of Illinois Press. 2003

In the midst of World War I, from April 28 to May 1, 1915, more than a thousand women from Europe and North America gathered in The Hague to discuss proposals for a peaceful end to the war. As one of the founders of the Woman's Peace Party, Jane Addams was among the attendees at the International Congress of Women, along with fellow social reformers and peace activists Emily G. Balch and Alice Hamilton. This book contains their journalistic accounts of the Congress's proceedings and results as well as their personal reflections on peace, war, politics, and the central role of women in the preservation of peace. Following the conference in The Hague, Addams and Balch traveled around Europe as members of delegations visiting various governmental leaders to demand an end to the war. In this book they describe the activities of these delegations, painting a vivid portrait of the emerging women's peace movement. With the continuing growth of the peace movement, the essays in Women at the Hague remain as timely as they were when first published in 1915. and collaborative spirit of the women's peace movement, conveying a strong awareness of the responsibility of women to protect the global community from the devastating effects of war.

The Long Road of Woman's Memory
ISBN: 0252027094

University of Illinois Press. 2001

Wild rumors of a Devil Baby - a child who has miniature horns and a forked tail and appears in retribution for a husband's cruelty - at Hull-House brought a flood of curiosity-seekers to Jane Addams' door. To her surprise, many of the most adamant about seeing the Devil Baby were older, working-class, immigrant women. These women, usually rather withdrawn from the community, seemed to spring to life in response to this apocryphal story - and to be inspired to tell stories of their own. The tales they shared with Addams in the wake of the Devil Baby were more personal and revealing than any they had previously told her: stories of abusive mates, lost or neglectful children, and endless, ill-paid menial labor endured on behalf of loved ones. In response to these sometimes wrenching conversations, Addams wrote "The Long Road of Woman's Memory", an extended musing on the role of memory and myth in women's lives.As Addams records the difficult recollections of these women she ponders the transformation of their experiences - so debilitating and full of anguish - into memories devoid of rancor and pain. She explores the catalytic function of cautionary tales in reviving older women's sense of agency. Through moving conversations with women who had lost sons on the battlefield, she emphasizes the importance of voicing a female perspective on war. The women's stories, graphically depicting the conditions in which they lived and labored and the purposefulness that sustained them, are gracefully woven together with Addams' insights on the functioning and purpose of memory. Seen in the context of Addams' personal connection with these diverse women and their stories, her larger efforts to bring about equity and social justice appear all the more courageous and vital. Charlene Haddock Seigfried's new introduction sets Addams' observations in the context of pragmatist and feminist traditions.

Peace and Bread in Time of War
ISBN: 0252070933

University of Illinois Press. 2002

Deals with the author's thoughts on pacifism. Turning away from the details of the war itself, the author relies on memory and introspection in this autobiographical portrayal of efforts to secure peace during the Great War.

The Excellent Becomes the Permanent
ISBN: B000NE6YXA

The Macmillan Company. 1932

My Friend, Julia Lathrop
ISBN: 0252071689

University of Illinois Press. 2004

Biography of one Jane Addams best friend written after Julia Lathrop's death. As one of the four members of the inner circle at Hull-House, Julia Lathrop played an instrumental role in the field of social reform for more than fifty years. Working tirelessly for women, children, immigrants and workers, she was the first head of the federal Children's Bureau, an ardent advocate of woman suffrage, and a cultural leader. She was also one of Jane Addams's best friends. My Friend, Julia Lathrop is Addams' lovingly rendered biography of a memorable colleague and confidant. The memoir reveals a great deal about the influence of Hull-House on the social and political history of the early twentieth century. An introduction by long-time Addams scholar Anne Firor Scott provides a broader account of women's work in voluntary associations.