Illinois State Library

Illinois Center for the Book


Individual Author Record

General Information

Name:  Mark Jacob  

Pen Name: None

Genre:

Born:


-- Mark Jacob on WorldCat -- http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=mark++jacob


Illinois Connection

Jacob lives in Evanston.

Biographical and Professional Information

Mark Jacob served as executive news editor and Sunday editor at the ''Chicago Sun-Times''. He now serves as a deputy metro editor at the ''Chicago Tribune'' and was part of the team that won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for explanatory journalism. He is a two-time Lisagor Award winner and co-writes the Tribune's biweekly feature ''10 Thing You Might Not Know'' with Stephan Benzkofer. Jacob is co-author of four books with his brother Matthew.


Published Works Expand for more information


Titles At Your Library

The Game That Was: The George Brace Baseball Photo Collection
ISBN: 0809230739

Contemporary Books. 1997

A unique collection of photographs offers an intimate, behind-the-scenes visual chronicle of baseball players from the 1930s, '40s, and '50s

Chicago under Glass: Early Photographs from the Chicago Daily News
ISBN: 0226089304

University of Chicago Press. 2007

When the Chicago Daily News closed its doors in March 1978 after over a century of publication, the city mourned the loss of an American original. The Daily News boasted the inventive, aggressive writing of such luminaries as Carl Sandburg and Ben Hecht. It was also one of the first newspapers in the country to feature black-and-white photography. In 1900, staffers from the paper’s art department began lugging bulky cameras, heavy glass plates, and explosive flash powder throughout the city. A labor strike, a boxing match, or a crime scene—it was all in a day’s work for the Daily News photographer.

These cameramen helped sell papers, but, as Mark Jacob and Richard Cahan reveal, they also made art. Chicago under Glass: Early Photographs from the Chicago Daily News is the first collection of images from the photo staff’s early years, 1901 to 1930. Jacob and Cahan, seasoned journalists themselves, have selected more than 250 images—many of which have never before been published—from the nearly 57,000 glass negatives housed at the Chicago History Museum. They include rare photographs of a young Buster Keaton with his wife and child, waiting to board a train and the notorious Al Capone outside a courtroom, smoking a cigar and consulting with his lawyer. Each thematic section begins with a fascinating introduction by the authors, and each image is accompanied by insightful historical commentary.

These fragile glass records are a remarkable piece of American history. Together, they capture a time of massive change and stark contrasts, the defining years in a place Nelson Algren called “Hustlertown.” From candid shots of the Eastland steamer disaster to the glittering electric lights of the White City amusement park and the grim aftermath of the Saint Valentine’s Day Massacre, the history these images reveal is not simply the story of Chicago, but the history of the modern American city.

What the Great Ate: A Curious History of Food and Fame
ISBN: 0307461955

Broadway Books. 2010

What was eating them? And vice versa.

In What the Great Ate, Matthew and Mark Jacob have cooked up a bountiful sampling of the peculiar culinary likes, dislikes, habits, and attitudes of famous—and often notorious—figures throughout history. Here is food

• As code: Benito Mussolini used the phrase “we’re making spaghetti” to inform his wife if he’d be (illegally) dueling later that day.
• As superstition: Baseball star Wade Boggs credited his on-field success to eating chicken before nearly every game.
• In service to country: President Thomas Jefferson, America’s original foodie, introduced eggplant to the United States and wrote down the nation’s first recipe for ice cream.

From Emperor Nero to Bette Davis, Babe Ruth to Barack Obama, the bite-size tidbits in What the Great Ate will whet your appetite for tantalizing trivia.

10 Things You Might Not Know About Nearly Everything: A Collection of Fascinating Historical, Scientific and Cultural Facts about People, Places and Things
ISBN: 1572841532

Agate Midway. 2013

For years, the Chicago Tribune's popular weekly feature column "10 Things You Might Not Know” has been informing and entertaining readers on a diverse range of fascinating subjects. 10 Things You Might Not Know About Nearly Everything is a comprehensive collection of these columns, presented in a fun and easy-to-read format. This book gives readers well-researched, obscure facts on universal topics—including arts and culture, food and leisure, history, politics, science and technology, sports, religion, lifestyle, language, and more.

10 Things You Might Not Know About Nearly Everything contains a plethora of surprising trivia and pertinent tidbits on so many different areas that will appeal to everyone from history buffs to sports fans to foodies, with an especially riveting look into Chicago-area history and facts. For example, did you know that the adult human body contains about half a pound of salt? Or that the U.S. had no national debt under President Andrew Jackson for a brief period of time around January 1835?

From amusing, lighthearted topics like beards and holidays to more serious subjects like taxes and juries, this collection of well-researched and universal trivia will make readers laugh and their jaws drop. 10 Things You Might Not Know About Nearly Everything will leave readers brighter, wittier, and curious to learn more about myriad worlds they never encountered before and will never forget.


Speaking Engagements

Speaking Engagement Availability: (No)